I'm an experienced cricket writer, broadcaster and graphic artist. I was part of the team that created TEST MATCH SOFA in 2009 and I occasionally wrote for various cricket fanzines and websites. In 2011, I beat Angus Fraser to the man of the match award in a LORD'S TAVERNERS game. In 2015, I was featured in the WISDEN CRICKETERS ALMANACK having returned bowling figures of 9 wickets for 1 run in a club match.

 

In 2017 I turned professional in the cricket media upon being hired by the BBC as a radio commentator, working mainly on the County Championship. Since then, I have been the BBC's most-used "third voice", the neutral commentator who calls the game alongside the BBC local broadcasters from each county radio station.

In 2018 I began writing for the WISDEN stable of publications and I commentated live for the MCC when they live-streamed Afghanistan's first match at Lord's to over a million viewers worldwide. I became involved with the ICELANDIC CRICKET ASSOCIATION, acting as their infamous "Twitter guy". I have a background in Iceland and thus could be described as Iceland's only cricket writer and broadcaster. I was the man behind the opening of the world's northernmost cricket ground.

 

In 2019 it was announced by the Indian press that I was to sign for the PUNJAB KINGS but I did not make my anticipated IPL debut when Ravichandran Ashwin played instead of me, bowling a variation I'd taught him the previous day. I made my international debut for Iceland against Hungary at 11 am on 18 October 2019, and announced my international retirement at soon as the match concluded, three hours later. This is a world record for the shortest international cricket career from debut to retirement.

In 2020 I began working for ECN as a television commentator. I've commentated on the European Cricket Series in Germany, Italy, Malta and Austria. I was the question-setter for the popular CRICKET MANIA app, and I created the first of the popular and renowned KIT HARRIS SCORESHEETS.

Though I suffer from the mental disabilities PTSD and GAD, which affect my ability to play cricket, I still get on the field regularly, bowling a form of mystery spin. By the end of 2020, I had taken 626 wickets at an average of 15.26. I am a hopeless batsman, and one of a very small number of people to boast more wickets taken than runs scored in a cricket career.

I'm available for work more or less any time, anywhere.

Kit Harris

London

May 2021